browsers, fiddler

Firefox and Fiddler – Easier than Ever

In a world where software and systems seem to march inexorably toward complexity, I love it when things get simpler.

Years ago, Firefox required non-obvious configuration changes to even send traffic to Fiddler. Eventually, Mozilla changed their default behavior on Windows to adopt the system’s proxy, meaning that Firefox would automatically use Fiddler when it was attached, just like Chrome, IE, Edge and other major browsers.

Unlike other browsers, Firefox also has its own Trusted Root Certificates store, which means that if you attempt to load a HTTPS page through Firefox with Fiddler’s HTTPS Decryption Mode enabled, you’ll get an error page:

FirefoxMITMDetected
MOZILLA_PKIX_ERROR_MITM_DETECTED error page

To configure Firefox to trust Fiddler’s root certificate, you used to have to manually install it by opening the FiddlerRoot.cer file, ticking the “Trust this CA to identify websites” box, and clicking OK:

FirefoxCA
The old way: Manually trusting Fiddler’s certificate

Making matters more annoying, any time you reset Fiddler’s root certificates (e.g. using the Actions button inside Tools > Fiddler Options > HTTPS), you had to do the whole dance over again. If you wanted to remove the obsolete root certificates, you had to visit a buried configuration UI:

ManualTrustFF
The old way: Administering the Firefox Certificate Store

Yesterday, I was delighted to learn that Firefox added a better option way back in Firefox 49. Simply visit about:config in Firefox and toggle the security.enterprise_roots.enabled setting to true.

FirefoxEnterprise
Enable the new hotness in about:config

After you make this change, Firefox will automatically trust certificates chained to roots in the Windows Trusted Root Certificate store, just like Chrome, Edge, IE and other browsers. Unfortunately, Mozilla has declined to turn this on by default, but it’s still a great option.

 

-Eric

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