Get Help with HTTPS problems

Sometimes, when you try to load a HTTPS address in Chrome, instead of the expected page, you get a scary warning, like this one:

image

Chrome has found a problem with the security of the connection and has blocked loading the page to protect your information.

In a lot of cases, if you’re just surfing around, the easiest thing to do is just find a different page to visit. But what happens if this happens on an important site that you really need to see? You shouldn’t just “click through” the error, because this could put your device or information at risk.

In some cases, clicking the ADVANCED link might explain more about the problem. For instance, in this example, the error message says that the site is sending the wrong certificate; you might try finding a different link to the site using your favorite search engine.

image

Or, in this case, Chrome explains that the certificate has expired, and asks you to verify that your computer clock’s Date and Time are set correctly:

image

You can see the specific error code in the middle of the text:

image

Some types of errors are a bit more confusing. For instance, NET::ERR_CERT_AUTHORITY_INVALID means that the site’s certificate didn’t come from a company that your computer is configured to trust.

image

Errors Everywhere?

What happens if you start encountering errors like this on every HTTPS page that you visit, even major sites like https://google.com?

In such cases, this often means that you have some software on your device or network that is interfering with your secure connections. Sometimes this software is well-meaning (e.g. anti-virus software, ad-blockers, parental control filters), and sometimes it’s malicious (adware, malware, etc). But even buggy well-meaning software can break your secure connections.

If you know what software is intercepting your traffic (e.g. your antivirus) consider updating it or contacting the vendor.

Getting Help

If you don’t know what to do, you may be able to get help in the Chrome Help Forum. When you ask for help, please include the following information:

  • The error code (e.g. NET::ERR_CERT_AUTHORITY_INVALID).
    • To help the right people find your issue, consider adding this to the title of your posting.
  • What version of Chrome you’re using. Visit chrome://version in your browser to see the version number
  • The type of device and network (e.g. “I’m using a laptop on wifi on my school’s network.”)
  • The error diagnostic information.

You can get diagnostic information by clicking or tapping directly on the text of the error code: image. When you do so, a bunch of new text will appear in the page:

image

You should select all of the text:

image

…then hit CTRL+C (or Command ⌘+C on Mac) to copy the text to your clipboard. You can then paste the text into your post. The “PEM encoded chain” information will allow engineers to see exactly what certificate the server sent to your computer, which might shed light on what specifically is interfering with your secure connections.

With any luck, we’ll be able to help you figure out how to surf securely again in no time!

 

-Eric

Get Help with HTTPS problems

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