App-to-Web Communication: Launching Web Apps

In recent posts, I’ve explored mechanisms to communicate from web content to local (native) apps, and I explained how web apps can use the HTML5 registerProtocolHandler API to allow launching them from either local apps or other websites. In today’s post, we’ll explore how local apps can launch web apps in the browser. It’s Simple…Continue reading “App-to-Web Communication: Launching Web Apps”

My New Chromium Build PC

While I do most of my work in an office, from time to time I work on code changes to Chromium at home. With the recent deprecation of Jumbo Builds, building the browser on my cheap 2016-era Dell XPS 8900 (i7-6700K) went from unpleasant to impractical. While I pondered buying a high-end Threadripper, I couldn’tContinue reading “My New Chromium Build PC”

Capture Network Logs (NetLog) from Edge and Chrome (and Electron)

Problems in accessing websites can often be found and fixed if the network traffic between the browser and the website is captured as the problem occurs. This short post explains how to capture such logs. Capturing Network Traffic Logs If someone asked you to read this post, chances are good that you were asked toContinue reading “Capture Network Logs (NetLog) from Edge and Chrome (and Electron)”

The Pitfalls of EventSource over HTTP/1.1

While there are many different ways for servers to stream data to clients, the Server-sent Events / EventSource Interface is one of the simplest. Your code simply creates an EventSource and then subscribes to its onmessage callback: Implementing the server side is almost as simple: your handler just prefaces each piece of data it wantsContinue reading “The Pitfalls of EventSource over HTTP/1.1”

Same-Site Cookies By Default

The Chrome team is embarking on a clever and bold plan to change the recipe for cookies. It’s one of the most consequential changes to the web platform in almost a decade, but with any luck, users won’t notice anything has changed. But if you’re a web developer, you should start testing your sites andContinue reading “Same-Site Cookies By Default”

Web-to-App Communication: DirectInvoke

Note: This post is part of a series about Web-to-App Communication techniques. Background Typically, if you want your website to send a document to a client application, you simply send the file as a download. Your server indicates that a file should be treated as a download in one of a few simple ways: Specifying aContinue reading “Web-to-App Communication: DirectInvoke”

Livin’ on the Edge: Root Causing Regressions

As we’ve been working to replatform the new Microsoft Edge browser atop Chromium, one interesting outcome has been early exposure to a lot more bugs in Chromium. Rapidly root-causing these regressions (bugs in scenarios that used to work correctly) has been a high-priority activity to help ensure Edge users have a good experience with ourContinue reading “Livin’ on the Edge: Root Causing Regressions”

Web-to-App Communication: App Protocols

Note: This post is part of a series about Web-to-App Communication techniques. Just over eight years ago, I wrote my last blog post about App Protocols, a class of URL schemes that typically1 open another program on your computer instead of returning data to the web browser.  App Protocols2 are both simple and powerful, allowingContinue reading “Web-to-App Communication: App Protocols”

Browser Architecture: Web-to-App Communication Overview

This is an introduction/summary post which will link to individual articles about browser mechanisms for communicating directly between web content and native apps on the local computer. This series aims to provide, for each mechanism, information about: On which platforms is it available? Can the site detect that the app/mechanism is available? Can the site send more than one messageContinue reading “Browser Architecture: Web-to-App Communication Overview”