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As we rebuild Microsoft Edge atop the Chromium open-source platform, we are working through various scenarios that behave differently in the new browser. In most cases, such scenarios also worked differently between 2018’s Edge (aka “Spartan”) and Chrome, but users either weren’t aware of the difference (because they used Trident-derived browsers inside their enterprise) or were aware and simply switched to a Microsoft-browser for certain tasks.

One example of a behavioral gap is related to running ClickOnce apps. ClickOnce is a Microsoft application deployment framework that aims to allow installation of native-code applications from the web in (around) one click.

Chrome and Firefox can successfully install and launch ClickOnce’s .application files if the .application file specifies a deploymentProvider element with a codebase attribute (example):

InstallPrompt

Installation prompt when opening an .application file.

However, it’s also possible to author and deploy an .application that doesn’t specify a deploymentProvider element (example). Such files launch correctly from Internet Explorer and pre-Chromium Edge, but fail in Firefox and Chrome with an error message:

ApplicationCannotBeStarted

ClickOnce fails for a downloaded .application file.

So, what gives? Why does this scenario magically work in Edge Spartan but not Firefox or Chrome?

The secret can be found in the EditFlags for the Application.Manifest ProgId (to which the .application filename extension and application/x-ms-application MIME type are mapped):

ApplicationManifestRegistry

Registry settings for the Application.Manifest ProgId.

The EditFlags contain the FTA_AlwaysUseDirectInvoke flag, which is documented on MSDN as 

FTA_AlwaysUseDirectInvoke 0x00400000
Introduced in Windows 8. Ensures that the verbs for the file type are invoked with a URL instead of a downloaded version of the file. Use this flag only if you’ve registered the file type’s verb to support DirectInvoke through the SupportedProtocols or UseUrl registration.

If you peek in the Application.Manifest’s Shell\Open\Command value, you’ll find that it calls for running the ShOpenVerbApplication function inside dfshim.dll, passing along the .application file’s path or URL in a parameter (%1):

“C:\Windows\System32\rundll32.exe” “C:\Windows\System32\dfshim.dll”,ShOpenVerbApplication %1

And therein lies the source of the behavioral difference.

When you download and open an Application.Manifest file from Edge Spartan, it passes the source URL for the .application to the handler. When you download the file in Firefox or Chrome, it passes the local file path of the downloaded .application file. With only the local file path, the ShOpenVerbApplication function doesn’t know how to resolve the relative references in the Application Manifest’s XML and the function bails out with the Cannot Start Application error message.

Setting FTA_AlwaysUseDirectInvoke also has the side-effect of removing the “Save” button from Edge’s download manager:

NoSave

…helping prevent the user from accidentally downloading an .application file that won’t work if opened outside of the browser from the Downloads folder (since the file’s original URL isn’t readily available to Windows Explorer).

Advice to Publishers

If you’re planning to distribute your ClickOnce application from a website, specify the URL in Visual Studio’s ClickOnce Publish Wizard:

Manifest

Specify “From a Web site” in the ClickOnce Publish Wizard.

This will ensure that even if DirectInvoke isn’t used, ShOpenVerbApplication can still find the files needed to install your application.

Workarounds

A company called Meta4 offers a Chrome browser extension that aims to add fuller support for ClickOnce to Chrome. The extension comes in two pieces– a traditional JavaScript extension and a trivial “native” executable (written in C#) that simply invokes the ShOpenVerbApplication call with the URL. The JavaScript extension launches and communicates with the native executable running outside of the Chrome sandbox using Native Messaging.

Unfortunately, the extension is a bit hacky– it installs a blocking onBeforeRequest handler which watches all requests (not just downloads), and if the target URL’s path component ends in .application, it invokes the native executable. Alas, it’s not really safe to make any assumptions about extensions in URLs (the web is based on MIME types, rather than filenames).

Next Steps

For the Edge team– TBD.

Do you use ClickOnce to deploy your applications? If so, are you specifying the deployment URL in the manifest file?

-Eric

PS: Notably, Internet Explorer doesn’t rely upon the DirectInvoke mechanism; removing the EditFlags value entirely causes IE to show an additional prompt but the install still succeeds. That’s because IE activates the file using a MIME handler (see the CLSID subkey of Application.Manifest) much like it does for .ZIP files. The DirectInvoke mechanism was invented, in part, to replace the legacy MIME handler mechanism.

As we finish up the next release of Windows 10, my team is hard at work triaging incoming bugs. Here’s a pattern that has come up a few times this month:

Bug: I click download in Edge:

DownloadButtonbut I end up on an error page:

WompWompDataURI

Womp womp.

If you watch the network traffic, you’ll see that no request even hits the network in the failing case. But, if you carefully scroll that ugly error URL to see the middle, the source of the problem appears:

ms-appx-web://microsoft.microsoftedge/assets/errorpages/dnserror.html?ErrorStatus=0x80704006&NetworkStatusSupported=1#data:text/csv;charset=UTF-8, ID,Datetime,Type,Status,Note,From,To,Amount%20(total),Amount%20(fee),Funding%20Source,Destination%0D%0A

The error shows that Edge failed to navigate to a URL with the Data URI scheme.

Ever since we introduced support for DATA URLs a decade ago in Internet Explorer 8, they’ve been throttled with one major limitation: You cannot navigate to these URIs at the top level of the browser. Edge loosened things up so that Data URLs under 4096 characters can be used as the source of IFRAMEs, but the browser will not navigate to a data URL at the top level.

(Yes, this error page could use some love.)

Now, you might remember that last winter, Chrome took a change to forbid top-level navigation to data URIs (due to spoofing concerns), but that restriction contains one important exception: navigations that get turned into downloads (due to their MIME type being one other than something expected to render in the browser) are exempted. So this scenario sorta works in Chrome. (I say “sorta” because the authors of this site failed to specify a meaningful filename on the link, so the file downloads without the all-important .csv extension).

ChromeWorksSorta2

So, does IE/Edge’s restriction on Data URIs mean that webdevs cannot generate downloadable files dynamically in JavaScript in a way that works in all browsers?

No, of course not.

There are many alternative approaches, but one simple approach is to just use a blob URL, like so:

  var text2 = new Blob(["a,b,c,d"], { type: 'text/csv'});
  var down2 = document.createElement("a");
  down2.download = "simple.csv";
  down2.href = window.URL.createObjectURL(text2);
  document.body.appendChild(down2);
  down2.innerText="I have a download attribute. Click me";

When the link is clicked, the CSV file is downloaded with a proper filename.

 

-Eric