web

Note: I expect to update this post over time. Last update: 5/8/2019.

Compatibility Deltas

As our new Edge Insider builds roll out to the public, we’re starting to triage reports of compatibility issues where Edge76 (the new Chromium-based Edge,  aka Anaheim) behaves differently than the old Edge (Edge18, aka Spartan) and/or Google Chrome.

In general, Edge76 will behave very similarly to Chrome, with the caveat that, to date, only Dev and Canary channels have been released. When looking at Chrome behavior, be sure to compare against the corresponding Chrome Dev and Canary channels.

However, we expect there will be some behavioral deltas between Edge76 and its Chrome-peer versions, so I’ll note those here too.

Note: I’ve previously blogged about interop issues between Edge18 and Chrome.

Navigation

  • For security reasons, Edge76 and Chrome block navigation to file:// URLs from non-file URLs. If a browser user clicks on a file: link on a webpage, nothing happens (except an error message in the Developer Tools console, noting “Not allowed to load local resource: file://host/whatever”). In contrast, Edge18 (like Internet Explorer before it) allowed HTTP/HTTPS-served pages in your Intranet Zone to navigate to URLs that use the file:// URL protocol; only pages in the Internet Zone were blocked from such navigations. No override for this block is available.

Downloads

  • Unlike IE/Edge18, Edge76/Chrome do not support DirectInvoke, a scheme whereby a download is converted into the launch of an application with a URL argument. DirectInvoke is most commonly used when launching Office documents and when running ClickOnce applications. For now, users can workaround the lack of ClickOnce support by installing an extension.
  • Edge76/Chrome do not support the proprietary msSaveBlob or msSaveOrOpenBlob APIs supported in Edge18. In most cases, you should instead use an A element with a download attribute.
  • Edge18 did not support navigation to or downloading from data URLs via the download attribute; Edge76/Chrome allow the download of data URLs up to 2mb in length. In most cases, you should prefer blob urls.

HTTPS – TLS Protocol

  • Edge76 and Chrome enable TLS/1.3 by default; Edge18 does not support TLS/1.3 prior to Windows 10 19H1, and even on that platform it is disabled by default (and known to be buggy).
  • Edge76 and Chrome support a different list of TLS ciphers than Edge18.
  • Edge76 and Chrome send GREASE tokens in HTTPS handshakes; Edge18 does not.
  • Edge76 and Chrome prohibit connections for HTTP/2 traffic from using banned (weak) ciphers, showing ERR_SPDY_INADEQUATE_TRANSPORT_SECURITY if the server attempts to use such ciphers. Edge18 did not enforce this requirement. This has primarily impacted intranet websites served by IIS on Windows Server 2012 where the server was either misconfigured or does not have the latest updates installed. Patching the server and/or adjusting its TLS configuration will resolve the problem.

HTTPS – Certificates

  • Edge76 and Chrome require that a site’s certificate contain its domain name in the SubjectAltName (SAN) field. Edge 18 permits the certificate to omit the SAN and if the domain name is in the Subject Common Name (CN) field. (All public CAs use the SAN; certificates that chain to a local/enterprise trusted root may need to be updated).
  • Edge76 and Chrome require certificates that chain to trusted root CAs to be logged in Certificate Transparency (CT). This generally isn’t a problem because public roots are supposed to log in CT as a part of their baseline requirements. However, certain organizations (including Microsoft and CAs) have hybrid roots which are both publicly trusted and issue privately within the organization. As a result, loading pages may error out with NET::ERR_CERTIFICATE_TRANSPARENCY_REQUIRED. To mitigate this, such organizations must either start logging internal certificates in CT, or set one of three policies under HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Edge\. Edge18 does not support CT.
  • Edge76 and Chrome use a custom Win32 client certificate picker UI, while Edge18 uses the system’s default certificate picker.

Cookies

  • Edge76 and Chrome support the Leave Secure Cookies Alone spec, which blocks HTTP pages from setting cookies with the Secure attribute and restricts the ways in which HTTP pages may interfere with cookies sent to HTTPS pages. Legacy Edge does not have these restrictions.
  • Edge76 and Chrome support Cookie prefixes (restrictions on cookies whose names begin with the prefixes __Secure- and __Host-). Legacy Edge does not enforce these restrictions.
  • Edge76, Chrome, and Firefox ignore Set-Cookie headers with values over 4096 characters in length (including cookie-controlling directives like SameSite). In contrast, IE and Edge18 permit cookies with name-value pairs up to 5118 characters in length.

Authentication and Login

  • In Edge76, Edge18, and Firefox, running the browser in InPrivate mode disables automatic Integrated Windows Authentication. Chrome and Internet Explorer do not disable automatic authentication in private mode. You can disable automatic authentication in Chrome by launching it with a command line argument: chrome.exe --auth-server-whitelist="_"
  • Edge18/Edge76 integrates a built-in single-sign-on (SSO) provider, such that configured account credentials are automatically injected into request headers for configured domains; this feature is disabled in InPrivate mode. Chrome does not have this behavior for Microsoft accounts.
  • Edge18 supports Azure Active Directory’s Conditional Access feature. For Chrome, an extension is required. Edge76 has not yet integrated support for this feature.

WebAPIs

-Eric

One of my final projects on the Chrome team was writing an internal document outlining Best Practices for Secure URL Display. Yesterday, it got checked into the public Chromium repro, so if this is a topic that interests you, please have a look!

Additionally, at Enigma 2019, the Chrome team released Trickuri (pronounced “trickery”) a tool for manual testing of URL displays against tricky attacks.

Update: The October 2018 Cumulative Security Update (KB4462919) brings the RS5 Cookie Control changes described below to Windows 10 RS2, RS3, and RS4.

Cookies are one of the most crucial features in the web platform, and large swaths of the web don’t work properly without them. Unfortunately, cookies are also one of the primary mechanisms that trackers and ad networks utilize to follow users around the web, potentially impacting users’ privacy. To that end, browsers have offered cookie controls for over twenty years.

Back in 2010, I wrote a summary of Internet Explorer’s Cookie Controls. IE’s cookie controls were very granular and quite powerful. The basic settings were augmented with P3P, a once-promising feature that allowed sites to advertise their privacy practices and browsers to automatically enforce users’ preferences against cookies. Unfortunately, major sites created fraudulent P3P statements, regulators failed to act, and the entire (complicated) system collapsed. P3P was removed from IE11 on Windows 10 and never implemented in Microsoft Edge.

Instead, Edge offers a very simple cookie control in the Privacy and Security section of the settings. Under the Cookies option, you have three choices: Don’t block cookies (the default), Block all cookies, and Block only third party cookies:

CookieSetting

This simple setting hides a bunch of subtlety that this post will explore.

Cookie => Cookie-Like

For the October 2018 update (aka “Redstone Five” aka “RS5”) we’ve made some important changes to Edge’s Cookie control.

The biggest of the changes is that Edge now matches other browsers, and uses the cookie controls to restrict cookie-like storage mechanisms, including localStoragesessionStorageindexedDB, Cache API, and ServiceWorkers. Each of these features can behave much like a cookie, with a similar potential impact on users’ privacy.

While we didn’t change the UI, it would be accurate to change it to:

CookieLike

This change improves privacy and can even improve site compatibility. During our testing, we were surprised to discover that some website flows fail if the browser blocks only 3rd party cookies without also blocking 3rd-party localStorage. This change brings Edge in line with other browsers with minor exceptions. For example, in Firefox 62, when 3rd-party site data is blocked, sessionStorage is still permitted in a 3rd-party context. In Edge RS5 and Chrome, 3rd party sessionStorage is blocked if the user blocks 3rd-party cookies.

Block Setting and Sending

Another subtlety exists because of the ambiguous terminology “third-party cookie.” A cookie is just a cookie– it belongs to a site (eTLD+1). Where the “party” comes into play is the context where the cookie was set and when it is sent.

In the web platform, unless a browser implements restrictions:

  • A cookie set in a first-party context will be sent to a first-party context
  • A cookie set in a first-party context will be sent to a third-party context
  • A cookie set in a third-party context will be sent to a first party context
  • A cookie set in a third-party context will be sent to a third-party context

For instance, in this sample page, if the IFRAME and IMG both set a cookie, these cookies are set in a third-party context:Contexts

  • If the user subsequently visits domain2.com, the cookie set by that 3rd-Party IFRAME will now be sent to the domain2.com server in a 1st-Party context.
  • If the user subsequently visits domain3.com, the cookie set by that 3rd-Party IMG will now be sent to the domain3.com server in a 1st-Party context.

Historically, Edge and IE’s “Block 3rd party cookies” options controlled only whether a cookie could be set from a 3rd party context, but did not impact whether a cookie initially set in a 1st party context would be sent to a 3rd party context.

As of Edge RS5, setting “Block only 3rd party cookies” will now also block cookies that were set in a 1st party context from being sent in a 3rd-party context. This change is in line with the behavior of other browsers.

Edge Controls Impacted By Zones

With the move from Internet Explorer to Edge, the Windows Security Zones architecture was largely left by the wayside.

Zones

However, cookie controls are one of a small number of exceptions to this; Edge applies the cookie restrictions only in the Internet Zone, the zone almost all sites fall into (outside of users on corporate networks).

Perhaps surprisingly, cookie-like features and the document.cookie getter are restricted, even in the Intranet and Trusted zones.

Chrome and Firefox do not take Windows Security Zones into account when applying cookie policies.

Test Cases

I’ve updated my old “Cookies” test page with new storage test cases. You can set your browser’s privacy controls:

Block3rdPartyChrome

Block3rdPartyFF

…then visit the test page to see how the browser limits features from 3rd-party contexts. You can use the Swap button on the page to swap 1st-party and 3rd-party contexts to see how restrictions have been applied. You should see that the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, and Edge all behave pretty much the same way.

One interesting exception is that when configured to Block 3rd-party Cookies, Edge still allows 3rd-party contexts to delete their own cookies. (This is used by federated logout pages, for instance). Chrome does not allow deletion in this scenario– the attempt to delete cookies is ignored.

 

-Eric


Appendix: Chromium Audit

In the course of our site-compatibility investigations, I had a look at Chromium’s behavior with regard to their cookie controls. In Chromium, Blink asks the host application for permission to use various storages, and these chokepoints check:

cookie_settings_->IsCookieAccessAllowed(origin_url, top_origin_url);

…which is sensitive to the various “Block Cookies” settings.

Mojo messages come up through renderer_host/chrome_render_message_filter.cc, gating access to

Additionally, ChromeContentBrowserClient gates

Elsewhere, IsCookieAccessAllowed is used to limit:

  • Flash Storage (PP_FLASHLSORESTRICTIONS_BLOCK)
  • Client Hints

Of these, Edge does not support WebSQL, FileSystem, SharedWorker, or Client Hints.

Yesterday, I started looking a site compatibility bug where a page’s layout is intermittently busted. Popping open the F12 Tools on the failing page, we see that a stylesheet is getting blocked because it lacks a CORS Access-Control-Allow-Origin response header:

NoStylesheetCORS

We see that the client demands the header because the LINK element that references it includes a crossorigin=anonymous directive:

crossorigin="anonymous" href="//s.axs.com/axs/css/90a6f65.css?4.0.1194" type="text/css" />

Aside: It’s not clear why the site is using this directive. CORS is required to use  SubResource Integrity, but this resource does not include an integrity attribute. Perhaps the goal was to save bandwidth by not sending cookies to the “s” (static content) domain?

In any case, the result is that the stylesheet sometimes fails to load as you navigate back and forward.

Looking at the network traffic, we find that the static content domain is trying to follow the best practice Include Vary: Origin when using CORS for access control.

Unfortunately, it’s doing so in a subtly incorrect way, which you can see when diffing two request/response pairs for the stylesheet:

VaryDiff

As you can see in the diff, the Origin token is added only to the response’s Vary directive when the request specifies an Origin header. If the request doesn’t specify an Origin, the server returns a response that lacks the Access-Control-* headers and also omits the Vary: Origin header.

That’s a problem. If the browser has the variant without the Access-Control directives in its cache, it will reuse that variant in response to a subsequent request… regardless of whether or not the subsequent request has an Origin header.

The rule here is simple: If your server makes a decision about what to return based on a what’s in a HTTP header, you need to include that header name in your Vary, even if the request didn’t include that header.

-Eric

PS: This seems to be a pretty common misconfiguration, which is mentioned in the fetch spec:


CORS protocol and HTTP caches

If CORS protocol requirements are more complicated than setting `Access-Control-Allow-Origin` to * or a static origin, `Vary` is to be used.

Vary: Origin

In particular, consider what happens if `Vary` is not used and a server is configured to send `Access-Control-Allow-Origin` for a certain resource only in response to a CORS request. When a user agent receives a response to a non-CORS request for that resource (for example, as the result of a navigation request), the response will lack `Access-Control-Allow-Origin` and the user agent will cache that response. Then, if the user agent subsequently encounters a CORS request for the resource, it will use that cached response from the previous non-CORS request, without `Access-Control-Allow-Origin`.

But if `Vary: Origin` is used in the same scenario described above, it will cause the user agent to fetch a response that includes `Access-Control-Allow-Origin`, rather than using the cached response from the previous non-CORS request that lacks `Access-Control-Allow-Origin`.

However, if `Access-Control-Allow-Origin` is set to * or a static origin for a particular resource, then configure the server to always send `Access-Control-Allow-Origin` in responses for the resource — for non-CORS requests as well as CORS requests — and do not use `Vary`.


 

Recently, a developer asked me how to enable Brotli content-compression support in FiddlerCore applications, so that APIs like oSession.GetResponseBodyAsString() work properly when the entity body has been compressed using brotli.

Right now, support requires two steps:

  1. Put brotli.exe (installed by Fiddler or off Github) into a Tools subfolder of the folder containing your application’s executable.
  2. Ensure that the Environment.SpecialFolder.MyDocuments folder exists and contains a FiddlerCore subfolder (e.g. C:\users\username\documents\FiddlerCore).

Step #1 allows FiddlerCore to find brotli.exe. Alternatively, you can set the fiddler.config.path.Tools preference to override the folder.

Step #2 allows FiddlerCore to create necessary temporary files. Sadly, this folder cannot presently be overridden [Bug].

One day, Fiddler might not need brotli.exe any longer, as Brotli compression is making its way into the framework.