Client Certificates and Logout

Back in May, I wrote about Client Certificate Authentication, a mechanism that allows websites to strongly validate the identity of their visitors using certificates presented by the visitor’s browser. One significant limitation for client certificate authentication is that there is no standards-based mechanism for a user to “log out” of a site that uses thatContinue reading “Client Certificates and Logout”

Seamless Single Sign-On

There are many different authentication primitives built into browsers. The most common include Web Forms authentication, HTTP authentication, client certificate authentication, and the new WebAuthN standard. Numerous different authentication frameworks build atop these, and many enterprise websites support more than one scheme. Each of the underlying authentication primitives has different characteristics: client certificate authentication isContinue reading “Seamless Single Sign-On”

Client Certificate Authentication

While most HTTPS sites only authenticate the server (using a certificate sent by the website), HTTPS also supports a mutual authentication mode, whereby the client supplies a certificate that authenticates the visiting user’s identity. Such a certificate might be stored on a SmartCard, or used as a part of an OS identity feature like WindowsContinue reading “Client Certificate Authentication”

Client Certificates on Android

Recently, this interesting tidbit crossed my Twitter feed: Sure enough, if you visited the site in Chrome, you’d get a baffling prompt. My hometown newspaper shows the same thing: Weird, huh? Client certificates are a way for a browser to supply a certificate to the server to verify the client’s identity (in the typical case,Continue reading “Client Certificates on Android”