cookies

Many websites offer a “Log in” capability where they don’t manage the user’s account; instead, they offer visitors the ability to “Login with <identity provider>.”

When the user clicks the Login button on the original relying party (RP) website, they are navigated to a login page at the identity provider (IP) (e.g. login.microsoft.com) and then redirected back to the RP. That original site then gets some amount of the user’s identity info (e.g. their Name & a unique identifier) but it never sees the user’s password.

Such Federated Identity schemes have benefits for both the user and the RP site– the user doesn’t need to set up yet another password and the site doesn’t have to worry about the complexity of safely storing the user’s password, managing forgotten passwords, etc.

In some cases, the federated identity login process (typically implemented as a JavaScript library) relies on navigating the user to a top-level page to log in, then back to the relying party website into which the library injects an IFRAME1 back to the identity provider’s website.

FederatedID

The authentication library in the RP top-level page communicates with the IP subframe (using postMessage or the like) to get the logged-in user’s identity information, API tokens, etc.

In theory, everything works great. The IP subframe in the RP page knows who the user is (by looking at its own cookies or HTML5 localStorage or indexedDB data) and can release to the RP caller whatever identity information is appropriate.

Crucially, however, notice that this login flow is entirely dependent upon the assumption that the IP subframe is accessing the same set of cookies, HTML5 storage, and/or indexedDB data as the top-level IP page. If the IP subframe doesn’t have access to the same storage, then it won’t recognize the user as logged in.

Unfortunately, this assumption has been problematic for many years, and it’s becoming even more dangerous over time as browsers ramp up their security and privacy features.

The root of the problem is that the IP subframe is considered a third-party resource, because it comes from a different domain (identity.example) than the page (news.example) into which it is embedded.

For privacy and security reasons, browsers might treat third-party resources differently than first-party resources. Examples include:

  1. The Block 3rd Party cookies option in most browsers
  2. The SameSite Cookie attribute
  3. P3P cookie blocking in Internet Explorer2
  4. Zone Partitioning in Internet Explorer and Edge Spartan3
  5. Safari’s Intelligent Tracking Protection
  6. Firefox Content Blocking
  7. Microsoft Edge Tracking Prevention

When a browser restricts access to storage for a 3rd party context, our theoretically simple login process falls apart. The IP subframe on the relying party doesn’t see the user’s login information because it is loaded in a 3rd party context. The authentication library is likely to conclude that the user is not logged in, and redirect them back to the login page. A frustrating and baffling infinite loop may result as the user is bounced between the RP and IP.

The worst part of all of this is that a site’s login process might usually work, but fail depending on the user’s browser choice, browser configuration, browser patch level, security zone assignments, or security/privacy extensions. As a result, a site owner might not even notice that some fraction of their users are unable to log in.

So, what’s a web developer to do?

The first task is awareness: Understand how your federated login library works — is it using cookies? Does it use subframes? Is the IP site likely to be considered a “Tracker” by popular privacy lists?

The second task is to build designs that are more resilient to 3rd-party storage restrictions:

  • Be sure to convey the expected state from the Identity Provider’s login page back to the Relying Party. E.g. if your site automatically redirects from news.example to identity.example/login back to news.example/?loggedin=1, the RP page should take note of that URL parameter. If the authentication library still reports “Not signed in”, avoid an infinite loop and do not redirect back to the Identity Provider automatically.
  • Authentication libraries should consider conveying identity information back to the RP directly, which will then save that information in a first party context.For instance, the IP could send the identity data to the RP via a HTTP POST, and the RP could then store that data using its own first party cookies.
  • For browsers that support it, the Storage Access API may be used to allow access to storage that would otherwise be unavailable in a 3rd-party context. Note that this API might require action on the part of the user (e.g. a frame click and a permission prompt).

The final task is verification: Ensure that you’re testing your site in modern browsers, with and without the privacy settings ratcheted up.

-Eric

[1] The call back to the IP might not use an IFRAME; it could also use a SCRIPT tag to retrieve JSONP, or issue a fetch/XHR call, etc. The basic principles are the same.
[2] P3P was removed from IE11 on Windows 10.
[3] In Windows 10 RS2, Edge 15 “Spartan” started sharing cookies across Security Zones, but HTML5 Storage and indexedDB remain partitioned.

I’ve been working on browsers professionally for 12 of the last 15 years, and in related areas for 20 of the last 20, and over the years I’ve discovered enough surprises in browser behavior that they’re no longer very surprising.

Back in April, I wrote up a quick post explaining how easy it is to delete a single site’s cookies in the new Edge browser. That post was written in response to a compatibility problem with some internal web application that could somehow get in a state where a single “bad” cookie would cause the application to fail to load. The team that owns the application later looked into things further and discovered that the problem was that the application was misbehaving upon receipt of a very old (over a month) session cookie.

Recall that there are two types of cookies:

  • Persistent cookies, sent to the server until the expiration date supplied when they were set, or until the user clears their cookies, whichever happens first, and
  • Session cookies, sent to the server until the end of the user’s browser session.

Now, in most cases, developers expect that Persistent cookies will live longer than Session cookies– most users restart their browsers (or computers) every few days, and many modern browsers require restart (to install updates) every few weeks. In contrast, many Persistent cookies are configured to last for a year or more.

So how did this zombie cookie live so long?

Until last week, I didn’t realize that these browser settings in Chrome/Edge76:

OnStartup

…and Firefox:

FirefoxOnStartup

…both behave very differently than the old setting from Internet Explorer:

IEOnStartup

…and the old setting from Edge 18 (Spartan) and earlier:

EdgeOnStartup

The Internet Explorer and Edge 18 settings simply open tabs to the URLs of the tabs that were open when you last closed your browser.

In contrast, the Firefox/Chrome/Edge76+ settings restore the browser session itself… which means that closing the browser does not delete your session cookies and doesn’t empty the HTML5 sessionStorage. In many ways, preserving session state makes sense– without it, users are likely to find that their restored tabs are immediately navigated to a login page when the browser is restarted.

However, a consequence of this session restoration behavior is that browsers with this option configured might keep session cookies alive for a very long time:kpk.png

If you’d like to play with your browser’s behavior, try setting the option and then play with this simple test page. (The background of the page is generated by the session cookie, and the sessionStorage and localStorage values are shown in the text of the page. Adjust the dropdown to change the color.)

Note: If the Chromium-based browser is restarted by visiting chrome://restart or if it restarts to install an update, it behaves as if “Continue where I left off” is set, even if it isn’t.

Web Developers: Given this session resumption behavior, it’s more important than ever to ensure that your site behaves reasonably upon receipt of an outdated session cookie (e.g. redirect the user to the login page instead of showing an error).

Users: If you enable the session resumption option, keep in mind that you can’t simply close your browser to “log out” of a site– you need to explicitly use the site’s logout option (I’ve written about this before).

 

-Eric

PS: If you’re really concerned about privacy, you can set the Keep local data only until you quit your browser option:

KeepLocal

This will clear all Session and Persistent storage areas every time you exit your browser, regardless of whether you’ve set the “On Startup: Continue where you left off”.

Note: I expect to update this post over time. Last update: 5/8/2019.

Compatibility Deltas

As our new Edge Insider builds roll out to the public, we’re starting to triage reports of compatibility issues where Edge76 (the new Chromium-based Edge,  aka Anaheim) behaves differently than the old Edge (Edge18, aka Spartan) and/or Google Chrome.

In general, Edge76 will behave very similarly to Chrome, with the caveat that, to date, only Dev and Canary channels have been released. When looking at Chrome behavior, be sure to compare against the corresponding Chrome Dev and Canary channels.

However, we expect there will be some behavioral deltas between Edge76 and its Chrome-peer versions, so I’ll note those here too.

Note: I’ve previously blogged about interop issues between Edge18 and Chrome.

Navigation

  • For security reasons, Edge76 and Chrome block navigation to file:// URLs from non-file URLs. If a browser user clicks on a file: link on a webpage, nothing happens (except an error message in the Developer Tools console, noting “Not allowed to load local resource: file://host/whatever”). In contrast, Edge18 (like Internet Explorer before it) allowed HTTP/HTTPS-served pages in your Intranet Zone to navigate to URLs that use the file:// URL protocol; only pages in the Internet Zone were blocked from such navigations. No override for this block is available.

Downloads

  • Unlike IE/Edge18, Edge76/Chrome do not support DirectInvoke, a scheme whereby a download is converted into the launch of an application with a URL argument. DirectInvoke is most commonly used when launching Office documents and when running ClickOnce applications. For now, users can workaround the lack of ClickOnce support by installing an extension.
  • Edge76/Chrome do not support the proprietary msSaveBlob or msSaveOrOpenBlob APIs supported in Edge18. In most cases, you should instead use an A element with a download attribute.
  • Edge18 did not support navigation to or downloading from data URLs via the download attribute; Edge76/Chrome allow the download of data URLs up to 2mb in length. In most cases, you should prefer blob urls.

HTTPS – TLS Protocol

  • Edge76 and Chrome enable TLS/1.3 by default; Edge18 does not support TLS/1.3 prior to Windows 10 19H1, and even on that platform it is disabled by default (and known to be buggy).
  • Edge76 and Chrome support a different list of TLS ciphers than Edge18.
  • Edge76 and Chrome send GREASE tokens in HTTPS handshakes; Edge18 does not.
  • Edge76 and Chrome prohibit connections for HTTP/2 traffic from using banned (weak) ciphers, showing ERR_SPDY_INADEQUATE_TRANSPORT_SECURITY if the server attempts to use such ciphers. Edge18 did not enforce this requirement. This has primarily impacted intranet websites served by IIS on Windows Server 2012 where the server was either misconfigured or does not have the latest updates installed. Patching the server and/or adjusting its TLS configuration will resolve the problem.

HTTPS – Certificates

  • Edge76 and Chrome require that a site’s certificate contain its domain name in the SubjectAltName (SAN) field. Edge 18 permits the certificate to omit the SAN and if the domain name is in the Subject Common Name (CN) field. (All public CAs use the SAN; certificates that chain to a local/enterprise trusted root may need to be updated).
  • Edge76 and Chrome require certificates that chain to trusted root CAs to be logged in Certificate Transparency (CT). This generally isn’t a problem because public roots are supposed to log in CT as a part of their baseline requirements. However, certain organizations (including Microsoft and CAs) have hybrid roots which are both publicly trusted and issue privately within the organization. As a result, loading pages may error out with NET::ERR_CERTIFICATE_TRANSPARENCY_REQUIRED. To mitigate this, such organizations must either start logging internal certificates in CT, or set one of three policies under HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Edge\. Edge18 does not support CT.
  • Edge76 and Chrome use a custom Win32 client certificate picker UI, while Edge18 uses the system’s default certificate picker.

Cookies

  • Edge76 and Chrome support the Leave Secure Cookies Alone spec, which blocks HTTP pages from setting cookies with the Secure attribute and restricts the ways in which HTTP pages may interfere with cookies sent to HTTPS pages. Legacy Edge does not have these restrictions.
  • Edge76 and Chrome support Cookie prefixes (restrictions on cookies whose names begin with the prefixes __Secure- and __Host-). Legacy Edge does not enforce these restrictions.
  • Edge76, Chrome, and Firefox ignore Set-Cookie headers with values over 4096 characters in length (including cookie-controlling directives like SameSite). In contrast, IE and Edge18 permit cookies with name-value pairs up to 5118 characters in length.

Authentication and Login

  • In Edge76, Edge18, and Firefox, running the browser in InPrivate mode disables automatic Integrated Windows Authentication. Chrome and Internet Explorer do not disable automatic authentication in private mode. You can disable automatic authentication in Chrome by launching it with a command line argument: chrome.exe --auth-server-whitelist="_"
  • Edge18/Edge76 integrates a built-in single-sign-on (SSO) provider, such that configured account credentials are automatically injected into request headers for configured domains; this feature is disabled in InPrivate mode. Chrome does not have this behavior for Microsoft accounts.
  • Edge18 supports Azure Active Directory’s Conditional Access feature. For Chrome, an extension is required. Edge76 has not yet integrated support for this feature.

WebAPIs

Group Policy and Command Line Arguments

By-default, Edge 76 shares almost all of the same Group Policies and command line arguments as Chrome 76.

If you’re using the registry to set a policy for Edge, put it under the

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Edge

…node instead of under the

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Google\Chrome

node.

If you’re trying to use a Chrome command line argument when launching in the new MSEdge.exe and it’s not working, check whether it has “blacklist” or “whitelist” in the name. If so, we probably renamed it.

For instance, want to tell Edge not to accept a 3DES ciphersuite for TLS? You need to use

msedge.exe --cipher-suite-denylist=0x000a

…instead of

chrome.exe --cipher-suite-blacklist=0x000a

….as you would with Chrome.

 

-Eric

Sometimes a site will not load by default but it works just fine in InPrivate mode or when loaded in a different browser profile. In many such cases, this means there’s a bug in the website where they’ve set a cookie but fail to load when that cookie is sent back.

This might happen, for instance, if a site set a ton of cookies over time but the server has a request length limit; after the cookies build up, the 16k header limit is exceeded and the server rejects all further requests.

Fortunately, it’s easy to fix this problem in the new Edge (and Chrome).

Delete Cookies for the Current Site

On the error page, click the icon next to the address bar and see whether there are Cookies in use:

ClearSiteCookies1

If so, click the item to open the Cookies in use screen. In the box that appears, select each server name and click the Remove button at the bottom to remove the cookies set for that server:

ClearSiteCookies2

After you remove all of the cookies, click the Done button and try reloading the page.

 

-Eric

 

InPrivate Mode was introduced in Internet Explorer 8 with the goal of helping users improve their privacy against both local and remote threats. Safari introduced a privacy mode in 2005.

All leading browsers offer a “Private Mode” and they all behave in the same general ways.

HTTP Caching

While in Private mode, browsers typically ignore any previously cached resources and cookies. Similarly, the Private mode browser does not preserve any cached resources beyond the end of the browser session. These features help prevent a revisited website from trivially identifying a returning user (e.g. if the user’s identity were cached in a cookie or JSON file on the client) and help prevent “traces” that might be seen by a later user of the device.

In Firefox’s and Chrome’s Private modes, a memory-backed cache container is used for the HTTP cache, and its memory is simply freed when the browser session ends. Unfortunately, WinINET never implemented a memory cache, so in Internet Explorer InPrivate sessions, data is cached in a special WinINET cache partition on disk which is “cleaned up” when the InPrivate session ends.

Because this cleanup process may be unreliable, in 2017, Edge made a change to simply disable the cache while running InPrivate, a design decision with significant impact on the browser’s network utilization and performance. For instance, consider the scenario of loading an image gallery that shows one large picture per page and clicking “Next” ten times:

InPrivateVsRegular

Because the gallery reuses some CSS, JavaScript, and images across pages, disabling the HTTP cache means that these resources must be re-downloaded on every navigation, resulting in 50 additional requests and a 118% increase in bytes downloaded for those eleven pages. Sites that reuse even more resources across pages will be more significantly impacted.

Another interesting quirk of Edge’s InPrivate implementation is that the browser will not download FavIcons while InPrivate. Surprisingly (and likely accidentally), the suppression of FavIcon downloads also occurs in any non-InPrivate windows so long as any InPrivate window is open on the system.

Web Platform Storage

Akin to the HTTP caching and cookie behaviors, browsers running in Private mode must restrict access to HTTP storage (e.g. HTML5 localStorage, ServiceWorker/CacheAPI, IndexedDB) to help prevent association/identification of the user and to avoid leaving traces behind locally. In some browsers and scenarios, storage mechanisms are simply set to an “ephemeral partition” while in others the DOM APIs providing access to storage are simply configured to return “Access Denied” errors.

You can explore the behavior of various storage mechanisms by loading this test page in Private mode and comparing to the behavior in non-Private mode.

Within IE and Edge’s InPrivate mode, localStorage uses an in-memory store that behaves exactly like the sessionStorage feature. This means that InPrivate’s storage is (incorrectly) not shared between tabs, even tabs in the same browser instance.

Network Features

Beyond the typical Web Storage scenarios, browser’s Private Modes should also undertake efforts to prevent association of users’ Private instance traffic with non-Private instance traffic. Impacted features here include anything that has a component that behaves “like a cookie” including TLS Session Tickets, TLS Resumption, HSTS directives, TCP Fast Open, Token Binding, ChannelID, and the like.

Automatic Authentication

In Private mode, a browser’s AutoComplete features should be set to manual-fill mode to prevent a “NameTag” vulnerability, whereby a site can simply read an auto-filled username field to identify a returning user.

On Windows, most browsers support silent and automatic authentication using the current user’s Windows login credentials and either the NTLM and Kerberos schemes. Typically, browsers are only willing to automatically authenticate to sites on “the Intranet“. Some browsers behave differently when in Private mode, preventing silent authentication and forcing the user to manually enter or confirm an authentication request.

In Firefox Private Mode and Edge InPrivate, the browser will not automatically respond to a HTTP/401 challenge for Negotiate/NTLM credentials.

In Chrome Incognito, Brave Incognito, and IE InPrivate, the browser will automatically respond to a HTTP/401 challenge for Negotiate/NTLM credentials even in Private mode.

Notes:

  • In Edge, the security manager returns MustPrompt when queried for URLACTION_CREDENTIALS_USE.
  • Unfortunately Edge’s Kiosk mode runs InPrivate, meaning you cannot easily use Kiosk mode to implement a display that projects a dashboard or other authenticated data on your Intranet.
  • For Firefox to support automatic authentication at all, the
    network.negotiate-auth.allow-non-fqdn and/or network.automatic-ntlm-auth.allow-non-fqdn preferences must be adjusted.

Detection of Privacy Modes

While browsers generally do not try to advertise to websites that they are running inside Private modes, it is relatively easy for a website to feature-detect this mode and behave differently. For instance, some websites like the Boston Globe block visitors in Private Mode (forcing login) because they want to avoid circumvention of their “Non-logged-in users may only view three free articles per month” paywall logic.

Sites can detect privacy modes by looking for the behavioral changes that signal that a given browser is running in Private mode; for instance, indexedDB is disabled in Edge while InPrivate. Detectors have been built for each browser and wrapped in simple JavaScript libraries. Defeating Private mode detectors requires significant investment on the part of browsers (e.g. “implement an ephemeral mode for indexedDB”) and fixes lagged until mainstream news sites (e.g. Boston Globe, New York Times) began using these detectors more broadly.

See also:

Advanced Private Modes

Generally, mainstream browsers have taken a middle ground in their privacy features, trading off some performance and some convenience for improved privacy. Users who are very concerned about maintaining privacy from a wider variety of threat actors need to take additional steps, like running their browser in a discardable Virtual Machine behind an anonymizing VPN/Proxy service, disabling JavaScript entirely, etc.

The Brave Browser offers a “Private Window with Tor” feature that routes traffic over the Tor anonymizing network; for many users this might be a more practical choice than the highly privacy-preserving Tor Browser Bundle, which offers additional options like built-in NoScript support to help protect privacy.

-Eric

I’ve been writing about Cookies a lot recently, and also did so almost a decade ago.

Edge/IE cookie limits

The June 1018 Cumulative Updates increased the per-domain cookie limit from 50 to 180 for IE and Edge across Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10 (TH1 to RS2). This higher limit matches Chrome’s cookie jar.

In IE/Edge, if the cookie length exceeds 10240 characters, document.cookie returns an empty string. (Cookies over 1023 characters can also lead to an empty document.cookie string in the event of a race condition). Cookie strings longer than 10KB will still be sent to the server in the Cookie request header, although many servers will reject headers over 16kb in size.

In IE/Edge, the browser will ignore attempts to set (and suppress attempts to send) individual cookies (`​name=value`) over 5118 characters in length.

Test Page

At the time of this writing, there’s a nice test page that attempts to exercise cookie limits using the DOM.

Update: The October 2018 Cumulative Security Update (KB4462919) brings the RS5 Cookie Control changes described below to Windows 10 RS2, RS3, and RS4.

Cookies are one of the most crucial features in the web platform, and large swaths of the web don’t work properly without them. Unfortunately, cookies are also one of the primary mechanisms that trackers and ad networks utilize to follow users around the web, potentially impacting users’ privacy. To that end, browsers have offered cookie controls for over twenty years.

Back in 2010, I wrote a summary of Internet Explorer’s Cookie Controls. IE’s cookie controls were very granular and quite powerful. The basic settings were augmented with P3P, a once-promising feature that allowed sites to advertise their privacy practices and browsers to automatically enforce users’ preferences against cookies. Unfortunately, major sites created fraudulent P3P statements, regulators failed to act, and the entire (complicated) system collapsed. P3P was removed from IE11 on Windows 10 and never implemented in Microsoft Edge.

Instead, Edge offers a very simple cookie control in the Privacy and Security section of the settings. Under the Cookies option, you have three choices: Don’t block cookies (the default), Block all cookies, and Block only third party cookies:

CookieSetting

This simple setting hides a bunch of subtlety that this post will explore.

Cookie => Cookie-Like

For the October 2018 update (aka “Redstone Five” aka “RS5”) we’ve made some important changes to Edge’s Cookie control.

The biggest of the changes is that Edge now matches other browsers, and uses the cookie controls to restrict cookie-like storage mechanisms, including localStoragesessionStorageindexedDB, Cache API, and ServiceWorkers. Each of these features can behave much like a cookie, with a similar potential impact on users’ privacy.

While we didn’t change the UI, it would be accurate to change it to:

CookieLike

This change improves privacy and can even improve site compatibility. During our testing, we were surprised to discover that some website flows fail if the browser blocks only 3rd party cookies without also blocking 3rd-party localStorage. This change brings Edge in line with other browsers with minor exceptions. For example, in Firefox 62, when 3rd-party site data is blocked, sessionStorage is still permitted in a 3rd-party context. In Edge RS5 and Chrome, 3rd party sessionStorage is blocked if the user blocks 3rd-party cookies.

Block Setting and Sending

Another subtlety exists because of the ambiguous terminology “third-party cookie.” A cookie is just a cookie– it belongs to a site (eTLD+1). Where the “party” comes into play is the context where the cookie was set and when it is sent.

In the web platform, unless a browser implements restrictions:

  • A cookie set in a first-party context will be sent to a first-party context
  • A cookie set in a first-party context will be sent to a third-party context
  • A cookie set in a third-party context will be sent to a first party context
  • A cookie set in a third-party context will be sent to a third-party context

For instance, in this sample page, if the IFRAME and IMG both set a cookie, these cookies are set in a third-party context:Contexts

  • If the user subsequently visits domain2.com, the cookie set by that 3rd-Party IFRAME will now be sent to the domain2.com server in a 1st-Party context.
  • If the user subsequently visits domain3.com, the cookie set by that 3rd-Party IMG will now be sent to the domain3.com server in a 1st-Party context.

Historically, Edge and IE’s “Block 3rd party cookies” options controlled only whether a cookie could be set from a 3rd party context, but did not impact whether a cookie initially set in a 1st party context would be sent to a 3rd party context.

As of Edge RS5, setting “Block only 3rd party cookies” will now also block cookies that were set in a 1st party context from being sent in a 3rd-party context. This change is in line with the behavior of other browsers.

Edge Controls Impacted By Zones

With the move from Internet Explorer to Edge, the Windows Security Zones architecture was largely left by the wayside.

Zones

However, cookie controls are one of a small number of exceptions to this; Edge applies the cookie restrictions only in the Internet Zone, the zone almost all sites fall into (outside of users on corporate networks).

Perhaps surprisingly, cookie-like features and the document.cookie getter are restricted, even in the Intranet and Trusted zones.

Chrome and Firefox do not take Windows Security Zones into account when applying cookie policies.

Test Cases

I’ve updated my old “Cookies” test page with new storage test cases. You can set your browser’s privacy controls:

Block3rdPartyChrome

Block3rdPartyFF

…then visit the test page to see how the browser limits features from 3rd-party contexts. You can use the Swap button on the page to swap 1st-party and 3rd-party contexts to see how restrictions have been applied. You should see that the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, and Edge all behave pretty much the same way.

One interesting exception is that when configured to Block 3rd-party Cookies, Edge still allows 3rd-party contexts to delete their own cookies. (This is used by federated logout pages, for instance). Chrome does not allow deletion in this scenario– the attempt to delete cookies is ignored.

 

-Eric


Appendix: Chromium Audit

In the course of our site-compatibility investigations, I had a look at Chromium’s behavior with regard to their cookie controls. In Chromium, Blink asks the host application for permission to use various storages, and these chokepoints check:

cookie_settings_->IsCookieAccessAllowed(origin_url, top_origin_url);

…which is sensitive to the various “Block Cookies” settings.

Mojo messages come up through renderer_host/chrome_render_message_filter.cc, gating access to

Additionally, ChromeContentBrowserClient gates

Elsewhere, IsCookieAccessAllowed is used to limit:

  • Flash Storage (PP_FLASHLSORESTRICTIONS_BLOCK)
  • Client Hints

Of these, Edge does not support WebSQL, FileSystem, SharedWorker, or Client Hints.