Inspecting Certificates in Chrome

With a check-in on Monday night, Chrome Canary build 60.0.3088 regained a quick path to view certificates from the top-level security UI. When the new feature is enabled, you can just click the lock icon to the left of the address box, then click the “Valid” link in the new Certificate section of the Page Information bubble to see the certificate:

Chrome 60 Page Info dropdown showing certificate section

In some cases, you might only be interested in learning which Certificate Authority issued the site’s certificate. If the connection security is Valid, simply hover over the link to see the issuer information in a tooltip:

Tooltip shows Issuer CA

The new link is also available on the blocking error page in the event of an HTTPS error, although no tooltip is shown:

The link also available at the blocking Certificate Error page

Note: For now, you must manually enable the new Certificate section. Type chrome://flags/#show-cert-link in Chrome’s address box and hit enter. Click the Enable link and relaunch Chrome.

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In the future, I expect that this section will be enabled by default; we’re presently blocked on other work to simplify the Page Information bubble.

If you want more information about the HTTPS connection, or to see the certificates of the resources used in the page, hit F12 to open the Developer Tools and click to the Security tab:

Chrome DevTools Security tab shows more information

You can learn more about Chrome’s certificate UIs and philosophy in this post from Chrome Security’s Chris Palmer.

-Eric Lawrence

Inspecting Certificates in Chrome

Security UI in Chrome

The combined address box and search bar at the top of the Chrome window is called the omnibox. The icon and optional verbose state text adjacent to that icon are collectively known as the Security Chip:

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The security chip can render in a number of states, depending on the status of the page:

image Secure – Shown for HTTPS pages that were securely delivered using a valid certificate and not compromised by mixed content or other problems.
image Secure, Extended Validation – Shown for Secure pages whose certificate indicates that Extended Validation was performed.
image Neutral – Shown for HTTP pages, as well as Chrome’s built-in pages, like chrome://extensions, as well as pages containing passive mixed content, or delivered using a policy-allowed SHA-1 certificates.
image Not Secure – Shown for HTTP pages that contain a password or credit card input field. Learn more.
image Not Secure (Red) – What Chrome will eventually show for all HTTP pages. You can configure a flag (chrome://flags/#mark-non-secure-as) to Always mark HTTP as actively dangerous today to get this experience early.
image Not Secure, Certificate Error – Shown when a site has a major problem with its certificate (e.g. it’s expired).
image Dangerous – Shown when Google Safe Browsing has identified this page as a source of malware or phishing attacks.

The flyout that appears when you click the security chip is called PageInfo or Website Settings; it shows the security status of the page and the permissions assigned to the origin website:

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The text atop the pageinfo flyout explains the security state of the page:

image imageimage mixedexpired

Clicking the Learn More link on the flyout for valid HTTPS sites once opened the Chrome Developer Tools’ Security Panel, but now it goes to a Help article. To learn more about the HTTPS state of the page, instead press F12 and select the Security Panel:

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The View certificate button opens the Windows certificate viewer and displays the current origin’s certificate. Reload the page with the Developer Tools open to see all of the secure origins in the Secure Origins List; selecting any origin allows you to view information about the connection and examine its certificate.

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The floating grey box at the bottom of the Chrome window that appears when you over over a link is called the status bubble. It is not a security surface and, like IE’s status bar, it is easily spoofed.

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Navigation to sites with severe security problems is blocked by an interstitial page.

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(A list of interstitial pages in Chrome can be found at chrome://interstitials/ ).

Clicking on the error code (e.g. ERR_CERT_AUTHORITY_INVALID in the screenshot below) will show more information about the certificate of the blocked site:

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Clicking the Advanced link shows more information, and in some cases will show an override link that allows you to disregard the security protection and proceed to the site anyway.

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If a site uses HTTP Strict Transport Security, the Proceed link is hidden and the user has no visible option to proceed.

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In current versions of Chrome, the user can type a fixed string (sometimes referred to as a Konami code) to bypass HSTS, but this option is deliberately undocumented and slated for removal from Chrome.

If a HTTPS problem is sufficiently bad, the network stack will not connect to the site and will show a network error page instead.

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-Eric

PS: There exists a developer reference to Chrome Security UI across platforms, but it’s somewhat outdated.

Security UI in Chrome